ACER TravelMate 4652LMi Display Hinge Replacement Instructions

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Contents

Getting Started

Hinge replacement for Acer TravelMate 4652LMi (TM4652LMi), which uses the same parts as several other models including the TM4650 and TM4150. Ordered for US$73 shipped through NotebookSolutions.CA, which wound up having them shipped directly from Acer in Texas. Parts: *6K.T75V5.002, 6KT75V5002

If one hinge failed already, replace both.

Disassembly and reassembly took a little over an hour for a first timer.

Tools Needed

Fine Phillips screwdrivers, two sizes; a fine flathead screwdriver; a big heavy-duty set of locking pliers to get a grip on the barrel of the fine screwdrivers in two instances; screen wipes; a clean working surface in which you won't lose any screws.

Lesson Learned

The method I should have used:

  • Shut down the computer.
  • Unplug AC power cable.
  • Use the sliding tab to remove the battery.
  • Close the LCD screen as best as you can. Flip the laptop upside down. Look along the left and right edges, close to the LCD hinges, for a screw on each side; mine were marked F10. Remove these two screws, which look fairly insubstantial.
  • Flip the laptop back over, as if you were going to be using it. Open the screen fully (180 degrees) so it's pointing up at your ceiling.
  • Spin the laptop around such that the right side is just off the edge of the table. There's a big plastic piece, actually two colors, occupying the last 2 1/2 inches (60 cm) of the laptop toward the hinges; mine has a small microphone hole near one end and a line of buttons for power, Web browser, etc.
  • Use your thumb from underneath to pry off the edge; the whole piece will begin to lift up. Work it out, being careful to note the two big semi-circular pieces that have to lip up around the laptop hinges. Set this piece carefully aside, and be nice to it -- it has a number of buttons.
  • You should be seeing a small green circuit board where all your buttons were. A single Phillips screw is in the middle; remove a surprisingly long screw and set it aside. GENTLY remove the green circuit board, by lifting up slowly from the right; a small silver plastic tab will keep the board from lifting up directly on the left.
  • Underneath, you should now see a relatively heavy wire with a connector coming from the left LCD hinge. Use the flathead screw driver to gently pry up one edge of the connector slightly, then the other edge. Pry a couple more times until it seems loose, then lift up by the cable.
  • Your LCD is now held by just one small wire bundle and whatever's left of your hinges. Go after the wire first.
  • Just above your keyboard, you should see two Phillips screws that actually hold the keyboard in. Remove this -- and don't be afraid, because they're very stubborn. I had to use the small Phillips screwdrivers and a locking wrench clamped on them to get enough of a grip to loosen these. Keep pushing down so you don't strip the screws. This was the hardest part of disassembly for me. Set the screws aside.
  • The keyboard slides up -- not in the sense of toward your face, but toward the laptop hinges. Slide it a short distance and you can then flip it upside down.
  • Follow that last wire coming from your LCD, which routes under the keyboard. On the 4652lmi (lets hope your model is somewhat similar), it's the wireless antenna. Two connectors hold it to the card; they pry up, but not particularly easily. Note which side goes to which; the white wire (aux) was on the right for mine.
  • When the connectors are loose, unroute the wire, freeing it up to the hinges.
  • This is probably a good time to slide the keyboard back into place and turn the screws a couple of times.
  • You should now have the LCD free, except for the remaining hinges themselves.
  • At the extreme edges of the corners, you'll see a triangular shaped piece of metal. That's the base of the hinge; a single screw on each now holds it in. Remove the screws. Lift the LCD straight up from the main body of the laptop. (Stuck? You -did- remove those screws from underneath in the first step, right? I didn't.)
  • Put the body of the laptop aside. You can now focus entirely on the LCD package itself.
  • At the top of the screen are two rubber caps, indented somewhat from the corners. Use your flat screw driver to scrape these away. No, you can't really reuse 'em, but at least the screws underneath are black. Leave the screws in place for a few moments.
  • Toward the bottom corners of the screen are a couple more covers made of mylar, like a balloon. Scrape them from the bottom edge with the screw driver. These you surely can't reuse.
  • Undo the four Phillips screws that you've now exposed.
  • Starting at one corner, -gently- slide the flathead screw driver into the bezel, the giant black plastic ring, around the LCD screen. Start to loosen the bezel, using fingers, screw drivers and prayer to work it loose without cracking it. If you get stuck on one direction, go in the other for a time. Once it's free, the bezel simply lifts straight up. Set it aside, and make sure you don't put anything on top of it.
  • Only do one hinge at a time. The hinges run along the edge of the LCD panel itself and wrap around at the top.
  • One heavier screw holds on the hinge at the bottom, on the innermost of two holes in the tab. Remove this screw.
  • Four smaller screws run along the edges of the hinge. Remove -- being careful not to slide 'em under the LCD, or drop 'em into your carpet. You may need to use two screwdrivers or a screwdriver and a thumb to lift them away from the LCD case.
  • The hinge should lift directly up. Set it aside, so you can show all your friends what a wonderful laptop technician you are later.
  • The new hinge should drop directly in. It won't. It's got to stay very close to the LCD panel, inside of a number of alignment tabs sticking up from the edge of the case. At the top of the case, a hole in the hinge part has to slide onto a small plastic part that sticks up. On the bottom, it has to slide into position on top of the two screw holes.
  • Try to put in one of the four side screws. They won't go. Use the small flathead screwdriver to gently, gently lift the LCD screen very slightly until you can put in the side screws.
  • Replace the screw on the bottom tab, with the screw on the inside hole.
  • Repeat for the other side of the LCD panel.

"Assembly is the reverse of disassembly." Yeah.

General Cautions

  • Make sure your antenna and LCD wires go through the designated holes near the hinge openings; don't pinch them when you put the bezel on.
  • The bezel will snap into place, seemingly by making lots of snapping noises. It probably won't be snapped into place in the right places. If one of your four LCD panel cover screws doesn't go in, you probably need to remove the screw completely and put pressure on the bezel again to re-snap it.
  • Remember the lower hinges have to drop down into the base of the laptop. Secure them with one screw on the top ... and, as your very last step, put in the less substantial screws from the bottom of the laptop.
  • The wireless card connectors are tough to put on. If you get them in position, you can use the back of a fine screwdriver to snap them into place.
  • Remember to open your screen 180 degrees before putting on the large plastic piece with the buttons and lights. Don't force the hinge cover parts through your wires; that would be, in technical terms, bad.
  • As the final step, close the laptop, flip it upside down, place the two remaining hinge screws from underneath.

Other Resources

Disclaimer, Copyright and Credits

Warning: These instructions are given without any warranty. They don't have to be complete or correct. Don't do any of the following steps if you're not sure of what you're doing. You could damage your notebook and you WILL lose your warranty. Everything you do will be at your own risk.

This guide is a courtesy of Mike Stucka.

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